Christmas present ideas to buy from Amazon

The links are for Amazon US

S H O P HOMESICK Candle (by state): https://amzn.to/3CSHdgU

HOMESICK Candle (by city): https://amzn.to/39KYfB4

Rechargeable Lighter: https://amzn.to/3zSxN3c

ANKER Portable Charger: https://amzn.to/3zRr4GA

Polaroid Camera: https://amzn.to/3kXGWDv

3D Moon Lamp: https://amzn.to/3mqkKRZ

TRUFF Hot Sauce: https://amzn.to/3zWpinv

Cinemood Portable Movie Theatre: https://amzn.to/3kRaDWI

Himalayan Salt Night Light: https://amzn.to/3zT3XLZ

Magnolia Table Cookbook: https://amzn.to/3zSpRPa

Chrissy Teigen Cravings Cookbook: https://amzn.to/3kOybLN

Architectural Digest Coffee Table Book: https://amzn.to/39NbNvX

 “That’s what she said” game: https://amzn.to/3ATWOML

Tile Tracking Device: https://amzn.to/3olUdYm

Mug with Basketball Hoop: https://amzn.to/3olUdYm

Knit Beanie with Bluetooth Speakers: https://amzn.to/2XUidqq

Reusable Coffee Cup: https://amzn.to/3AROz3v

iPhone Charger + Bottle Opening Keychain: https://amzn.to/3oiRRd0

Thank you so much for watching I hope the video gave you some good Christmas present ideas.

M U S I C + Music from Epidemic Sounds

☆ Shop Lone Fox (Home Decor, DIY Supplies + More!): https://lonefox.com/

If you buy using the links I might get a commission.

About Amazon

Amazon.com, an online retailer, manufacturer of electronic book readers, and Web services provider that became the iconic example of electronic commerce. Its headquarters are in Seattle, Washington.

Amazon.com is a vast Internet-based enterprise that sells books, music, movies, housewares, electronics, toys, and many other goods, either directly or as the middleman between other retailers and Amazon.com’s millions of customers. Its Web services business includes renting data storage and computing resources, so-called “cloud computing,” over the Internet. Its considerable online presence is such that, in 2012, 1 per cent of all Internet traffic in North America travelled in and out of Amazon.com data centres.

The company also makes the market-leading Kindle e-book readers. Its promotion of these devices has led to dramatic growth in e-book publishing and turned Amazon.com into a major disruptive force in the book-publishing market.

In 1994 Jeff Bezos, a former Wall Street hedge fund executive, incorporated Amazon.com, choosing the name primarily because it began with the first letter of the alphabet and because of its association with the vast South American river. On the basis of research he had conducted, Bezos concluded that books would be the most logical product initially to sell online. Amazon.com was not the first company to do so; Computer Literacy, a Silicon Valley bookstore, began selling books from its inventory to its technically astute customers in 1991. However, the promise of Amazon.com was to deliver any book to any reader anywhere.

While Amazon.com famously started as a bookseller, Bezos contended from its start that the site was not merely a retailer of consumer products. He argued that Amazon.com was a technology company whose business was simplifying online transactions for consumers.

The Amazon.com business strategy was often met with scepticism. Financial journalists and analysts disparaged the company by referring to it as Amazon.bomb. Doubters claimed Amazon.com ultimately would lose in the marketplace to established bookselling chains, such as Borders and Barnes & Noble, once they had launched competing e-commerce sites. The lack of company profits until the final quarter of 2001 seemed to justify its critics.

However, Bezos dismissed naysayers as not understanding the massive growth potential of the Internet. He argued that to succeed as an online retailer, a company needed to “Get Big Fast,” a slogan he had printed on employee T-shirts. In fact, Amazon.com did grow fast, reaching 180,000 customer accounts by December 1996, after its first full year in operation, and less than a year later, in October 1997, it had 1,000,000 customer accounts. Its revenues jumped from $15.7 million in 1996 to $148 million in 1997, followed by $610 million in 1998. Amazon.com’s success propelled its founder to become Time magazine’s 1999 Person of the Year.

The company expanded rapidly in other areas. Its Associate’s program, where other Web sites could offer merchandise for sale and Amazon.com would fill the order and pay a commission, grew from one such site in 1996 to more than 350,000 by 1999. Following Bezos’s initial strategy, the company quickly began selling more than books. Music and video sales started in 1998. That same year it began international operations with the acquisition of online booksellers in the United Kingdom and Germany. By 1999 the company was also selling consumer electronics, video games, software, home-improvement items, toys and games, and much more.

To sustain that growth, Amazon.com needed more than private investors to underwrite the expansion. As a result, in May 1997, less than two years after opening its virtual doors to consumers and without ever having made a profit, Amazon.com became a public company, raising $54 million on the NASDAQ market. In addition to the cash, the company was able to use its high-flying stock to fund its aggressive growth and acquisition strategy.

Although offering more types of goods broadened its appeal, it was Amazon.com’s service that gained it customer loyalty and ultimate profitability. Its personalization tools recommended other products to buy on the basis of both a customer’s purchasing history and data from buyers of the same items. Its publishing of customer reviews of products fostered a “community of consumers” who helped each other find everything from the right book to the best blender.

Article Credit

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Amazoncom

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